Christophe Clement
Trainer Bios

Christophe Clement

Born: November 1, 1965 in Paris, France

Record at Keeneland

Total Wins: 73

Stakes Wins: 15

Career Firsts

First Grade 1 Win: 1994 Queen Elizabeth II Challenge Cup at Keeneland with Danish (IRE)

First Stakes Win: 1992 Gulfstream Park Budweiser Breeders’ Cup (G2) with Passagere du Soir (GB)

First Graded Stakes Win: 1992 Gulfstream Park Budweiser Breeders’ Cup (G2) with Passagere du Soir (GB)

First Career Win: Oct. 20, 1991, at Belmont Park with Spectaculaire

At Keeneland


Won first Keeneland race during the 1994 Spring Meet.

First Keeneland stakes win was the 1994 Queen Elizabeth II Challenge Cup (G1) with Danish (IRE).

Won the 2010 and 2011 Shadwell Turf Mile (G1) with champion Gio Ponti.

Leading trainer of the 2010 Spring Meet with nine wins.

Career


Triple Crown win: 2014 Belmont (G1) with Tonalist.

North American career earnings exceed $127 million with 1,903 wins through Jan. 21, 2019.

Trained Gio Ponti, champion older male and champion turf male in 2009 and champion turf male in 2010.

Saddled 1,000th winner of his career when Vacare won the Dahlia (G2) at Hollywood Park on Dec. 21, 2008.

Click here for his Equibase career record.

Background


Christophe grew up in racing, exercising horses for his father, Miguel, a leading trainer in France. Among the horses his father trained was Nelcius, winner of the 1966 French Derby. Christophe’s brother, Nicolas, is also a successful trainer in France and conditioned 1990 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe (G1) winner Saumarez.

While taking classes at the University of Assas in Paris, Christophe worked mornings for legendary trainers Alec Head and Christiane “Criquette” Head-Maarek. He graduated with a degree in economics, came to the U.S. in 1986 and went through a six-month intern program at Taylor Made Farm. He then worked for Racing Hall of Fame trainer Shug McGaughey for 1 1/2 years while McGaughey had such horses as Personal Ensign and Polish Navy.

Returning to Europe, Christophe worked for trainer Luca Cumani at Newmarket and was his top assistant for four years. He credits Cumani with teaching him the level of discipline necessary to be a Thoroughbred trainer. By 1991, he was ready to strike out on his own in the U.S.